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𝗜𝘁𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝗶𝘀𝗵 𝗨𝗽𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗲 - 𝗢𝘂𝗿 𝗻𝗲𝗲𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗝𝗲𝘀𝘂𝘀 & 𝗔𝗱𝘃𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝘀𝗰𝗵𝗲𝗱𝘂𝗹𝗲/𝗿𝗲𝘀𝗼𝘂𝗿𝗰𝗲𝘀
https://app.flocknote.com/note/19135300 OR https://bit.ly/HangingOutatOLM 

𝑭𝒓𝒐𝒎 𝑭𝒂𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓 𝑱𝒂𝒎𝒆𝒔 . . . 

𝘖𝘶𝘳 𝘯𝘦𝘦𝘥 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘶𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴—𝘧𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥 𝘧𝘪𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘭𝘺 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘳—𝘪𝘴 𝘢 𝘨𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘣𝘦𝘨𝘪𝘯 𝘢𝘶𝘳 𝘈𝘥𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘵. 𝘈𝘭𝘭𝘰𝘸 𝘮𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘴𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘢 𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘵𝘭𝘦 𝘦𝘹𝘤𝘦𝘳𝘱𝘵 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘮𝘺 𝘧𝘢𝘷𝘰𝘳𝘪𝘵𝘦 𝘯𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘴, 𝘔𝘪𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘦𝘭 𝘖’𝘉𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯, 𝘪𝘯 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘣𝘰𝘰𝘬 𝘗𝘭𝘢𝘨𝘶𝘦 𝘑𝘰𝘶𝘳𝘯𝘢𝘭:

“𝑇ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑤𝑎𝑦𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑑𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑡𝑟𝑜𝑢𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑖𝑛 𝑎𝑛 𝑎𝑓𝑓𝑙𝑢𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑎𝑔𝑒. 𝐼𝑓 𝑦𝑜𝑢 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑒𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑒𝑦 𝑜𝑟 𝑖𝑛𝑓𝑙𝑢𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒, ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑡ℎ, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑟, 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑜𝑓𝑓 𝑡𝑟𝑜𝑢𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑎 𝑙𝑜𝑛𝑔 𝑡𝑖𝑚𝑒. 𝑌𝑜𝑢 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑝𝑎𝑑 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑏𝑢𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑟 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑡 𝑦𝑜𝑢𝑟𝑠𝑒𝑙𝑓 𝑢𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑙 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑖𝑙𝑙𝑢𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑚𝑎𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑦 𝑖𝑠 𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑝𝑙𝑒𝑡𝑒. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑜𝑛𝑙𝑦 𝑤𝑒𝑎𝑘𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑠 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑠𝑒𝑒𝑚𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑙𝑦 𝑝𝑒𝑟𝑓𝑒𝑐𝑡 𝑚𝑒𝑡ℎ𝑜𝑑 𝑖𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑦𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑙𝑖𝑓𝑒 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑛 𝑏𝑒 𝑝𝑟𝑒𝑜𝑐𝑐𝑢𝑝𝑖𝑒𝑑 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑝𝑎𝑑𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔, 𝑏𝑢𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔. 𝑀𝑜𝑠𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑢𝑠 𝑑𝑜 𝑖𝑡 𝑡𝑜 𝑠𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑑𝑒𝑔𝑟𝑒𝑒. 𝑊𝑒 𝑐𝑎𝑛’𝑡 ℎ𝑒𝑙𝑝 𝑖𝑡 𝑟𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑦. 𝑃𝑎𝑖𝑛 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑖𝑠𝑛’𝑡 𝑓𝑢𝑛; ℎ𝑒𝑙𝑝𝑙𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑠 𝑖𝑠 𝑠𝑐𝑎𝑟𝑦. 𝐵𝑢𝑡 𝑠𝑢𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑓𝑖𝑛𝑑𝑠 𝑢𝑠 𝑎𝑙𝑙 𝑠𝑜𝑜𝑛𝑒𝑟 𝑜𝑟 𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟. 𝑇ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑖𝑠 𝑛𝑜 ℎ𝑖𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑝𝑙𝑎𝑐𝑒, 𝑎𝑛𝑑, 𝑤ℎ𝑒𝑛 𝑟𝑎𝑖𝑠𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑎 𝑓𝑎𝑚𝑖𝑙𝑦, 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑒𝑠𝑝𝑒𝑐𝑖𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑦 𝑒𝑥𝑝𝑜𝑠𝑒𝑑 𝑡𝑜 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑑𝑎𝑛𝑔𝑒𝑟𝑠 𝑜𝑓 ℎ𝑢𝑚𝑎𝑛 𝑒𝑥𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒.       

𝐼 𝑑𝑖𝑑𝑛’𝑡 𝑘𝑛𝑜𝑤 𝑖𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑛, 𝑏𝑢𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑠𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑎 ℎ𝑎𝑝𝑝𝑦 𝑓𝑎𝑚𝑖𝑙𝑦 𝑖𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑑𝑒𝑎𝑡ℎ 𝑜𝑓 𝑠𝑒𝑙𝑓𝑖𝑠ℎ𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑠. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑓𝑎𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑑𝑖𝑒 𝑖𝑓 ℎ𝑒 𝑖𝑠 𝑡𝑜 𝑔𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝑙𝑖𝑓𝑒 𝑡𝑜 ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑠𝑝𝑜𝑢𝑠𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑐ℎ𝑖𝑙𝑑𝑟𝑒𝑛. 𝑁𝑜𝑡 𝑎 𝑝𝑙𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑎𝑛𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑏𝑢𝑡 𝑎 𝑡𝑟𝑢𝑒 𝑜𝑛𝑒. 𝐴𝑛 𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑟𝑒 𝑙𝑖𝑓𝑒𝑡𝑖𝑚𝑒 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑏𝑒 𝑠𝑝𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑎𝑣𝑜𝑖𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑖𝑡. 𝐼𝑡’𝑠 𝑠𝑖𝑚𝑝𝑙𝑦 𝑛𝑜𝑡 𝑒𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ 𝑡𝑜 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑡𝑒𝑐𝑡. 𝐼𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑚𝑠𝑒𝑙𝑣𝑒𝑠, 𝑜𝑓 𝑐𝑜𝑢𝑟𝑠𝑒, 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑡𝑒𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑔𝑜𝑜𝑑 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑛𝑒𝑐𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑎𝑟𝑦 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠. 𝑇ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑖𝑠 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑝𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑖𝑏𝑖𝑙𝑖𝑡𝑦.       

𝐵𝑢𝑡 𝑎 𝑓𝑎𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒 𝑎 𝑚𝑜𝑢𝑛𝑡𝑎𝑖𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑚𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑎𝑙 𝑔𝑜𝑜𝑑𝑠 𝑓𝑜𝑟 ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑓𝑎𝑚𝑖𝑙𝑦 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑑𝑒𝑓𝑒𝑛𝑑 𝑖𝑡 𝑎𝑔𝑎𝑖𝑛𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑙𝑙 𝑘𝑖𝑛𝑑𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑖𝑛𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑣𝑒𝑛𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒𝑠, 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑘𝑖𝑛𝑔 ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑦, ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑑𝑜𝑛𝑒 ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑝𝑎𝑟𝑡, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑠𝑡𝑖𝑙𝑙 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑚𝑖𝑠𝑠𝑒𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑎𝑙 𝑝𝑜𝑖𝑛𝑡: ℎ𝑒 𝑖𝑠 𝑐𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑒𝑑 𝑡𝑜 𝑏𝑒 𝑎𝑛 𝑖𝑚𝑎𝑔𝑒 𝑜𝑓 𝑙𝑜𝑣𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑡𝑟𝑢𝑡ℎ. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 ℎ𝑜𝑢𝑠𝑒 ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒𝑠, 𝑏𝑒 𝑖𝑡 𝑎 𝑐𝑎𝑏𝑖𝑛, 𝑎 𝑚𝑎𝑛𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛, 𝑜𝑟 𝑎 𝑏𝑎𝑟𝑔𝑒 𝑝𝑎𝑖𝑛𝑡𝑒𝑑 𝐶ℎ𝑟𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑚𝑎𝑠 𝑐𝑜𝑙𝑜𝑟𝑠, 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑎𝑡 𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝑐𝑜𝑟𝑒 𝑎 ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑖𝑠 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑡𝑜 𝑙𝑜𝑜𝑘 𝑎𝑡 𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝑝𝑜𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑡𝑦. 𝐴𝑠 𝑙𝑜𝑛𝑔 𝑎𝑠 𝑤𝑒’𝑟𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑣𝑖𝑛𝑐𝑒𝑑 𝑜𝑓 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑜𝑤𝑛 𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑒𝑛𝑔𝑡ℎ𝑠, 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑐𝑙𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑠, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑐𝑎𝑔𝑒𝑦 𝑎𝑏𝑖𝑙𝑖𝑡𝑦 𝑡𝑜 𝑒𝑛𝑑𝑢𝑟𝑒, 𝑤𝑒 𝑠𝑡𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑘 𝑤𝑒’𝑟𝑒 𝑖𝑛 𝑐ℎ𝑎𝑟𝑔𝑒. 𝑊𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑢𝑐𝑡 𝑎 𝑙𝑖𝑓𝑒𝑠𝑡𝑦𝑙𝑒 𝑜𝑓 𝑒𝑙𝑖𝑚𝑖𝑛𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑑𝑖𝑓𝑓𝑖𝑐𝑢𝑙𝑡𝑖𝑒𝑠 𝑎𝑡 𝑎𝑛𝑦 𝑐𝑜𝑠𝑡. 𝐼𝑡 𝑡𝑎𝑘𝑒𝑠 𝑎 𝑙𝑜𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑝𝑎𝑑𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑖𝑓 𝑦𝑜𝑢’𝑟𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑎𝑣𝑜𝑖𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑢𝑛𝑒𝑥𝑝𝑙𝑎𝑖𝑛𝑎𝑏𝑙𝑒, 𝑢𝑛𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑏𝑙𝑜𝑤𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑠𝑢𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔. 𝑇ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑎 𝑡𝑖𝑚𝑒, ℎ𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟, 𝑤ℎ𝑒𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑒𝑙𝑎𝑏𝑜𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑒 𝑑𝑒𝑓𝑒𝑛𝑠𝑒 𝑠𝑦𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑚 𝑐𝑟𝑢𝑚𝑏𝑙𝑒𝑠.”    
 
𝘐𝘧 𝘸𝘦 𝘥𝘰𝘯’𝘵 𝘴𝘦𝘦 𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘯𝘦𝘦𝘥 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴, 𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘰𝘸𝘯 𝘱𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘵𝘪𝘦𝘴, 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘈𝘥𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘪𝘴𝘯’𝘵 𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘦𝘹𝘤𝘪𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨. 𝘐𝘧, 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘥, 𝘸𝘦 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘸𝘦 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘯𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘪𝘧 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴 𝘣𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘦𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘥𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘳𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘵𝘴, 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘸𝘦 𝘸𝘰𝘯’𝘵 𝘣𝘦 𝘢𝘣𝘭𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘣𝘶𝘵 𝘦𝘤𝘩𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘵, 𝘦𝘢𝘨𝘦𝘳 𝘤𝘳𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘈𝘥𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘵, “𝘔𝘢𝘳𝘢𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘩𝘢!” 𝘊𝘰𝘮𝘦, 𝘓𝘰𝘳𝘥 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴! … 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘵, 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦, 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘧𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘺, 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘴𝘶𝘧𝘧𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴, 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘫𝘰𝘺𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘱𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘵𝘺! 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘢𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘨𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘱𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘦. 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘢𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘨𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘫𝘰𝘺. 
 
𝘍𝘢𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘑𝘢𝘮𝘦𝘴 
 __ 
We look forward to seeing you at Our Lady of Mercy taking part in many of the offerings we have,  or maybe when you stop by and visit Jesus at the Blessed Sacrament Chapel, at daily Mass during the week, or during Eucharistic Adoration. 
  
View the full posting at https://app.flocknote.com/note/19135300 OR https://bit.ly/HangingOutatOLM

𝗜𝘁'𝘀 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗣𝗮𝗿𝗶𝘀𝗵 𝗨𝗽𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗲 - 𝗢𝘂𝗿 𝗻𝗲𝗲𝗱 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝗝𝗲𝘀𝘂𝘀 & 𝗔𝗱𝘃𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝘀𝗰𝗵𝗲𝗱𝘂𝗹𝗲/𝗿𝗲𝘀𝗼𝘂𝗿𝗰𝗲𝘀
app.flocknote.com/note/19135300 OR bit.ly/HangingOutatOLM

𝑭𝒓𝒐𝒎 𝑭𝒂𝒕𝒉𝒆𝒓 𝑱𝒂𝒎𝒆𝒔 . . .

𝘖𝘶𝘳 𝘯𝘦𝘦𝘥 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘩𝘶𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴—𝘧𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥 𝘧𝘪𝘳𝘴𝘵𝘭𝘺 𝘪𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘳—𝘪𝘴 𝘢 𝘨𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘵 𝘱𝘭𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘣𝘦𝘨𝘪𝘯 𝘢𝘶𝘳 𝘈𝘥𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘵. 𝘈𝘭𝘭𝘰𝘸 𝘮𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘴𝘩𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘢 𝘭𝘪𝘵𝘵𝘭𝘦 𝘦𝘹𝘤𝘦𝘳𝘱𝘵 𝘧𝘳𝘰𝘮 𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘮𝘺 𝘧𝘢𝘷𝘰𝘳𝘪𝘵𝘦 𝘯𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘭𝘪𝘴𝘵𝘴, 𝘔𝘪𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘦𝘭 𝘖’𝘉𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯, 𝘪𝘯 𝘩𝘪𝘴 𝘣𝘰𝘰𝘬 𝘗𝘭𝘢𝘨𝘶𝘦 𝘑𝘰𝘶𝘳𝘯𝘢𝘭:

“𝑇ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑤𝑎𝑦𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑑𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑡𝑟𝑜𝑢𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑖𝑛 𝑎𝑛 𝑎𝑓𝑓𝑙𝑢𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑎𝑔𝑒. 𝐼𝑓 𝑦𝑜𝑢 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑒𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑒𝑦 𝑜𝑟 𝑖𝑛𝑓𝑙𝑢𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒, ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑡ℎ, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑟, 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑠𝑡𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑜𝑓𝑓 𝑡𝑟𝑜𝑢𝑏𝑙𝑒 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑎 𝑙𝑜𝑛𝑔 𝑡𝑖𝑚𝑒. 𝑌𝑜𝑢 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑝𝑎𝑑 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑏𝑢𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑟 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑡 𝑦𝑜𝑢𝑟𝑠𝑒𝑙𝑓 𝑢𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑙 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑖𝑙𝑙𝑢𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑚𝑎𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑦 𝑖𝑠 𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑝𝑙𝑒𝑡𝑒. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑜𝑛𝑙𝑦 𝑤𝑒𝑎𝑘𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑠 𝑖𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑠𝑒𝑒𝑚𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑙𝑦 𝑝𝑒𝑟𝑓𝑒𝑐𝑡 𝑚𝑒𝑡ℎ𝑜𝑑 𝑖𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑦𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑙𝑖𝑓𝑒 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑛 𝑏𝑒 𝑝𝑟𝑒𝑜𝑐𝑐𝑢𝑝𝑖𝑒𝑑 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝑝𝑎𝑑𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔, 𝑏𝑢𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑑𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑎𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔. 𝑀𝑜𝑠𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑢𝑠 𝑑𝑜 𝑖𝑡 𝑡𝑜 𝑠𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑑𝑒𝑔𝑟𝑒𝑒. 𝑊𝑒 𝑐𝑎𝑛’𝑡 ℎ𝑒𝑙𝑝 𝑖𝑡 𝑟𝑒𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑦. 𝑃𝑎𝑖𝑛 𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑖𝑠𝑛’𝑡 𝑓𝑢𝑛; ℎ𝑒𝑙𝑝𝑙𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑠 𝑖𝑠 𝑠𝑐𝑎𝑟𝑦. 𝐵𝑢𝑡 𝑠𝑢𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑓𝑖𝑛𝑑𝑠 𝑢𝑠 𝑎𝑙𝑙 𝑠𝑜𝑜𝑛𝑒𝑟 𝑜𝑟 𝑙𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟. 𝑇ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑖𝑠 𝑛𝑜 ℎ𝑖𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑝𝑙𝑎𝑐𝑒, 𝑎𝑛𝑑, 𝑤ℎ𝑒𝑛 𝑟𝑎𝑖𝑠𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑎 𝑓𝑎𝑚𝑖𝑙𝑦, 𝑦𝑜𝑢 𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑒𝑠𝑝𝑒𝑐𝑖𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑦 𝑒𝑥𝑝𝑜𝑠𝑒𝑑 𝑡𝑜 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑑𝑎𝑛𝑔𝑒𝑟𝑠 𝑜𝑓 ℎ𝑢𝑚𝑎𝑛 𝑒𝑥𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒.

𝐼 𝑑𝑖𝑑𝑛’𝑡 𝑘𝑛𝑜𝑤 𝑖𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑛, 𝑏𝑢𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑠𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑎 ℎ𝑎𝑝𝑝𝑦 𝑓𝑎𝑚𝑖𝑙𝑦 𝑖𝑠 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑑𝑒𝑎𝑡ℎ 𝑜𝑓 𝑠𝑒𝑙𝑓𝑖𝑠ℎ𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑠. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 𝑓𝑎𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑑𝑖𝑒 𝑖𝑓 ℎ𝑒 𝑖𝑠 𝑡𝑜 𝑔𝑖𝑣𝑒 𝑙𝑖𝑓𝑒 𝑡𝑜 ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑠𝑝𝑜𝑢𝑠𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑐ℎ𝑖𝑙𝑑𝑟𝑒𝑛. 𝑁𝑜𝑡 𝑎 𝑝𝑙𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑎𝑛𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ𝑡 𝑏𝑢𝑡 𝑎 𝑡𝑟𝑢𝑒 𝑜𝑛𝑒. 𝐴𝑛 𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑟𝑒 𝑙𝑖𝑓𝑒𝑡𝑖𝑚𝑒 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑏𝑒 𝑠𝑝𝑒𝑛𝑡 𝑎𝑣𝑜𝑖𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑖𝑡. 𝐼𝑡’𝑠 𝑠𝑖𝑚𝑝𝑙𝑦 𝑛𝑜𝑡 𝑒𝑛𝑜𝑢𝑔ℎ 𝑡𝑜 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑡𝑒𝑐𝑡. 𝐼𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑚𝑠𝑒𝑙𝑣𝑒𝑠, 𝑜𝑓 𝑐𝑜𝑢𝑟𝑠𝑒, 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑡𝑒𝑐𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑎𝑟𝑒 𝑔𝑜𝑜𝑑 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑛𝑒𝑐𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑎𝑟𝑦 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑔𝑠. 𝑇ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑖𝑠 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑝𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑖𝑏𝑖𝑙𝑖𝑡𝑦.

𝐵𝑢𝑡 𝑎 𝑓𝑎𝑡ℎ𝑒𝑟 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒 𝑎 𝑚𝑜𝑢𝑛𝑡𝑎𝑖𝑛 𝑜𝑓 𝑚𝑎𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑎𝑙 𝑔𝑜𝑜𝑑𝑠 𝑓𝑜𝑟 ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑓𝑎𝑚𝑖𝑙𝑦 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑑𝑒𝑓𝑒𝑛𝑑 𝑖𝑡 𝑎𝑔𝑎𝑖𝑛𝑠𝑡 𝑎𝑙𝑙 𝑘𝑖𝑛𝑑𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑖𝑛𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑣𝑒𝑛𝑖𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒𝑠, 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑘𝑖𝑛𝑔 ℎ𝑒 𝑐𝑎𝑛 𝑟𝑒𝑠𝑡 𝑒𝑎𝑠𝑦, ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑑𝑜𝑛𝑒 ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑝𝑎𝑟𝑡, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑠𝑡𝑖𝑙𝑙 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑚𝑖𝑠𝑠𝑒𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑒𝑠𝑠𝑒𝑛𝑡𝑖𝑎𝑙 𝑝𝑜𝑖𝑛𝑡: ℎ𝑒 𝑖𝑠 𝑐𝑎𝑙𝑙𝑒𝑑 𝑡𝑜 𝑏𝑒 𝑎𝑛 𝑖𝑚𝑎𝑔𝑒 𝑜𝑓 𝑙𝑜𝑣𝑒 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑡𝑟𝑢𝑡ℎ. 𝑇ℎ𝑒 ℎ𝑜𝑢𝑠𝑒 ℎ𝑒 𝑝𝑟𝑜𝑣𝑖𝑑𝑒𝑠, 𝑏𝑒 𝑖𝑡 𝑎 𝑐𝑎𝑏𝑖𝑛, 𝑎 𝑚𝑎𝑛𝑠𝑖𝑜𝑛, 𝑜𝑟 𝑎 𝑏𝑎𝑟𝑔𝑒 𝑝𝑎𝑖𝑛𝑡𝑒𝑑 𝐶ℎ𝑟𝑖𝑠𝑡𝑚𝑎𝑠 𝑐𝑜𝑙𝑜𝑟𝑠, 𝑚𝑢𝑠𝑡 ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑒 𝑎𝑡 𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝑐𝑜𝑟𝑒 𝑎 ℎ𝑒𝑎𝑟𝑡 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑖𝑠 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑡𝑜 𝑙𝑜𝑜𝑘 𝑎𝑡 𝑖𝑡𝑠 𝑝𝑜𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑡𝑦. 𝐴𝑠 𝑙𝑜𝑛𝑔 𝑎𝑠 𝑤𝑒’𝑟𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑣𝑖𝑛𝑐𝑒𝑑 𝑜𝑓 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑜𝑤𝑛 𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑒𝑛𝑔𝑡ℎ𝑠, 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑐𝑙𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟𝑛𝑒𝑠𝑠, 𝑎𝑛𝑑 𝑜𝑢𝑟 𝑐𝑎𝑔𝑒𝑦 𝑎𝑏𝑖𝑙𝑖𝑡𝑦 𝑡𝑜 𝑒𝑛𝑑𝑢𝑟𝑒, 𝑤𝑒 𝑠𝑡𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑛𝑘 𝑤𝑒’𝑟𝑒 𝑖𝑛 𝑐ℎ𝑎𝑟𝑔𝑒. 𝑊𝑒 𝑐𝑜𝑛𝑠𝑡𝑟𝑢𝑐𝑡 𝑎 𝑙𝑖𝑓𝑒𝑠𝑡𝑦𝑙𝑒 𝑜𝑓 𝑒𝑙𝑖𝑚𝑖𝑛𝑎𝑡𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑑𝑖𝑓𝑓𝑖𝑐𝑢𝑙𝑡𝑖𝑒𝑠 𝑎𝑡 𝑎𝑛𝑦 𝑐𝑜𝑠𝑡. 𝐼𝑡 𝑡𝑎𝑘𝑒𝑠 𝑎 𝑙𝑜𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑝𝑎𝑑𝑑𝑖𝑛𝑔 𝑖𝑓 𝑦𝑜𝑢’𝑟𝑒 𝑡𝑜 𝑎𝑣𝑜𝑖𝑑 𝑡ℎ𝑒 𝑢𝑛𝑒𝑥𝑝𝑙𝑎𝑖𝑛𝑎𝑏𝑙𝑒, 𝑢𝑛𝑗𝑢𝑠𝑡 𝑏𝑙𝑜𝑤𝑠 𝑜𝑓 𝑠𝑢𝑓𝑓𝑒𝑟𝑖𝑛𝑔. 𝑇ℎ𝑒𝑟𝑒 𝑤𝑖𝑙𝑙 𝑐𝑜𝑚𝑒 𝑎 𝑡𝑖𝑚𝑒, ℎ𝑜𝑤𝑒𝑣𝑒𝑟, 𝑤ℎ𝑒𝑛 𝑡ℎ𝑖𝑠 𝑒𝑙𝑎𝑏𝑜𝑟𝑎𝑡𝑒 𝑑𝑒𝑓𝑒𝑛𝑠𝑒 𝑠𝑦𝑠𝑡𝑒𝑚 𝑐𝑟𝑢𝑚𝑏𝑙𝑒𝑠.”

𝘐𝘧 𝘸𝘦 𝘥𝘰𝘯’𝘵 𝘴𝘦𝘦 𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘯𝘦𝘦𝘥 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴, 𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘰𝘸𝘯 𝘱𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘵𝘪𝘦𝘴, 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘈𝘥𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘪𝘴𝘯’𝘵 𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺 𝘦𝘹𝘤𝘪𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨. 𝘐𝘧, 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘥, 𝘸𝘦 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘸𝘦 𝘢𝘳𝘦 𝘯𝘰𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘰𝘶𝘵 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘪𝘧 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴 𝘣𝘦𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘦𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘴𝘵 𝘥𝘦𝘴𝘪𝘳𝘦 𝘰𝘧 𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘵𝘴, 𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘸𝘦 𝘸𝘰𝘯’𝘵 𝘣𝘦 𝘢𝘣𝘭𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘣𝘶𝘵 𝘦𝘤𝘩𝘰 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘵, 𝘦𝘢𝘨𝘦𝘳 𝘤𝘳𝘺 𝘰𝘧 𝘈𝘥𝘷𝘦𝘯𝘵, “𝘔𝘢𝘳𝘢𝘯𝘢𝘵𝘩𝘢!” 𝘊𝘰𝘮𝘦, 𝘓𝘰𝘳𝘥 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴! … 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘳𝘵, 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦, 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘧𝘢𝘮𝘪𝘭𝘺, 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘴𝘶𝘧𝘧𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴, 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘫𝘰𝘺𝘴, 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘪𝘯𝘵𝘰 𝘮𝘺 𝘱𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘵𝘺! 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘢𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘨𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘱𝘦𝘢𝘤𝘦. 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘢𝘭𝘰𝘯𝘦 𝘨𝘪𝘷𝘦 𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘧𝘦𝘤𝘵 𝘫𝘰𝘺.

𝘍𝘢𝘵𝘩𝘦𝘳 𝘑𝘢𝘮𝘦𝘴
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We look forward to seeing you at Our Lady of Mercy taking part in many of the offerings we have, or maybe when you stop by and visit Jesus at the Blessed Sacrament Chapel, at daily Mass during the week, or during Eucharistic Adoration.

View the full posting at app.flocknote.com/note/19135300 OR bit.ly/HangingOutatOLM
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“𝘼𝙙𝙫𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙞𝙨 𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚. 𝙒𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙖 𝙢𝙖𝙧𝙫𝙚𝙡𝙤𝙪𝙨 𝙩𝙞𝙢𝙚 𝙞𝙣 𝙬𝙝𝙞𝙘𝙝 𝙩𝙤 𝙧𝙚𝙣𝙚𝙬 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙙𝙚𝙨𝙞𝙧𝙚, 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙣𝙤𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙡𝙜𝙞𝙖, 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙡 𝙡𝙤𝙣𝙜𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝘾𝙝𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙩 𝙩𝙤 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 — 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙃𝙞𝙢 𝙩𝙤 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 𝙚𝙫𝙚𝙧𝙮 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙩𝙤 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙨𝙤𝙪𝙡 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙀𝙪𝙘𝙝𝙖𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙩. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝘾𝙝𝙪𝙧𝙘𝙝 𝙚𝙣𝙘𝙤𝙪𝙧𝙖𝙜𝙚𝙨 𝙪𝙨: 𝙃𝙚 𝙞𝙨 𝙖𝙗𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙩𝙤 𝙖𝙧𝙧𝙞𝙫𝙚!” 
— 𝙎𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙩 𝙅𝙤𝙨𝙚𝙢𝙖𝙧𝙞𝙖 𝙀𝙨𝙘𝙧𝙞𝙫𝙖

Every single Advent season is filled with opportunity and the possibility of living a deeper life —a fuller life and if we make a choice now to take these days of Advent seriously we will not miss the opportunity to draw deeply in the heart and the life that God is inviting us to during Advent.  

In this season of longing, hope, and new beginnings, let us journey together moving toward a deeper adoration of the King of kings, who comes in the quiet of the night to save us.  Lets begin at MAGNIFY Weds 11/30 @ 7pm.  We hope to see you then!

There will be an additional priest during Confessions... (see the reflection below on repentance to inspire us to go).
#scripturalreflection #frmichaelkearney #confessions #prayerministry #adorationpraiseandworship #joshgoodman #bringthefamily #bringthechildren 
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REPENTING OF ALL THINGS THAT COME BETWEEN JESUS AND ME
At the core of repentance is the humble recognition that we cannot save ourselves. Try as we might, we will never achieve by our own power the type of happiness for which we so desperately long. Saint Augustine famously said, Man is a beggar before God. When we accept this truth and enter that space to cry out in need, it is as though we grant God permission to do as He wishes within us. While Gods strength is not curbed by our closed hearts, in His kindness, His love is never forced. God patiently waits for us to welcome His power.

The power of God is especially manifested in healing, whereby Gods gift of grace restores us to an order and integrity that underlies the disorder and chaos we so often experience in our interior lives. In our anguished confusion, every attempt to medicate and cover our wounds only further agitates the sorrow and suffering within. The landscape of our hearts becomes a dry and parched land. The weight of our inner pain cripples us.

Such is the condition of the soul in its poverty, and through the prophets, God speaks directly into this poverty with a promise: The wilderness and the dry land shall be glad, the desert shall rejoice and blossom; like the lily, it shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice with joy and singing (Isaiah 35:1-2)

Advent is the end of a long history of waiting for the fulfillment of an ancient promise. If our Advent journey is to bear rich fruit, we must recognize our parched paralysis, and in an act of trust, surrender to God.

When Jesus, the fulfillment of the promises, looks upon the paralytic, He confronts the root cause of suffering: Your sins are forgiven you (Luke 5:20). His merciful gaze, when it rests upon a repentant heart, brings life to what was dead and healing to what was broken.  So let us open our hearts to Jesus power to strengthen and heal you at Confession.

Let us pray.
𝘈𝘭𝘮𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘺 𝘎𝘰𝘥, 𝘐 𝘢𝘮 𝘱𝘰𝘰𝘳 𝘪𝘯 𝘴𝘱𝘪𝘳𝘪𝘵. 𝘛𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘬 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘮𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘳𝘦𝘱𝘢𝘪𝘳 𝘮𝘺 𝘰𝘸𝘯 𝘣𝘳𝘰𝘬𝘦𝘯𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘴. 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴, 𝘐 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘱𝘳𝘦𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘠𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘢𝘳𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘭 𝘮𝘦𝘢𝘯𝘴 𝘳𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘧 𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘣𝘦𝘵𝘸𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘮𝘦. 𝘏𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘮𝘦 𝘦𝘮𝘣𝘳𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘦𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘥—𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘧𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘥𝘰𝘮—𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘳𝘶𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦. 𝘐 𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘣𝘦𝘨𝘨𝘢𝘳, 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘥𝘺 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘠𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨, 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦-𝘨𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘗𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦.

“𝘼𝙙𝙫𝙚𝙣𝙩 𝙞𝙨 𝙝𝙚𝙧𝙚. 𝙒𝙝𝙖𝙩 𝙖 𝙢𝙖𝙧𝙫𝙚𝙡𝙤𝙪𝙨 𝙩𝙞𝙢𝙚 𝙞𝙣 𝙬𝙝𝙞𝙘𝙝 𝙩𝙤 𝙧𝙚𝙣𝙚𝙬 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙙𝙚𝙨𝙞𝙧𝙚, 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙣𝙤𝙨𝙩𝙖𝙡𝙜𝙞𝙖, 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙧𝙚𝙖𝙡 𝙡𝙤𝙣𝙜𝙞𝙣𝙜 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝘾𝙝𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙩 𝙩𝙤 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 — 𝙛𝙤𝙧 𝙃𝙞𝙢 𝙩𝙤 𝙘𝙤𝙢𝙚 𝙚𝙫𝙚𝙧𝙮 𝙙𝙖𝙮 𝙩𝙤 𝙮𝙤𝙪𝙧 𝙨𝙤𝙪𝙡 𝙞𝙣 𝙩𝙝𝙚 𝙀𝙪𝙘𝙝𝙖𝙧𝙞𝙨𝙩. 𝙏𝙝𝙚 𝘾𝙝𝙪𝙧𝙘𝙝 𝙚𝙣𝙘𝙤𝙪𝙧𝙖𝙜𝙚𝙨 𝙪𝙨: 𝙃𝙚 𝙞𝙨 𝙖𝙗𝙤𝙪𝙩 𝙩𝙤 𝙖𝙧𝙧𝙞𝙫𝙚!”
— 𝙎𝙖𝙞𝙣𝙩 𝙅𝙤𝙨𝙚𝙢𝙖𝙧𝙞𝙖 𝙀𝙨𝙘𝙧𝙞𝙫𝙖

Every single Advent season is filled with opportunity and the possibility of living a deeper life —a fuller life and if we make a choice now to take these days of Advent seriously we will not miss the opportunity to draw deeply in the heart and the life that God is inviting us to during Advent.

In this season of longing, hope, and new beginnings, let us journey together moving toward a deeper adoration of the King of kings, who comes in the quiet of the night to save us. Let's begin at MAGNIFY Weds 11/30 @ 7pm. We hope to see you then!

There will be an additional priest during Confessions... (see the reflection below on repentance to inspire us to go).
#scripturalreflection #frmichaelkearney #confessions #prayerministry #adorationpraiseandworship #joshgoodman #bringthefamily #bringthechildren
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REPENTING OF ALL THINGS THAT COME BETWEEN JESUS AND ME
At the core of repentance is the humble recognition that we cannot save ourselves. Try as we might, we will never achieve by our own power the type of happiness for which we so desperately long. Saint Augustine famously said, "Man is a beggar before God." When we accept this truth and enter that space to cry out in need, it is as though we grant God permission to do as He wishes within us. While God's strength is not curbed by our closed hearts, in His kindness, His love is never forced. God patiently waits for us to welcome His power.

The power of God is especially manifested in healing, whereby God's gift of grace restores us to an order and integrity that underlies the disorder and chaos we so often experience in our interior lives. In our anguished confusion, every attempt to medicate and cover our wounds only further agitates the sorrow and suffering within. The landscape of our hearts becomes a dry and parched land. The weight of our inner pain cripples us.

Such is the condition of the soul in its poverty, and through the prophets, God speaks directly into this poverty with a promise: "The wilderness and the dry land shall be glad, the desert shall rejoice and blossom; like the lily, it shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice with joy and singing" (Isaiah 35:1-2)

Advent is the end of a long history of waiting for the fulfillment of an ancient promise. If our Advent journey is to bear rich fruit, we must recognize our parched paralysis, and in an act of trust, surrender to God.

When Jesus, the fulfillment of the promises, looks upon the paralytic, He confronts the root cause of suffering: "Your sins are forgiven you" (Luke 5:20). His merciful gaze, when it rests upon a repentant heart, brings life to what was dead and healing to what was broken. So let us open our hearts to Jesus' power to strengthen and heal you at Confession.

Let us pray.
𝘈𝘭𝘮𝘪𝘨𝘩𝘵𝘺 𝘎𝘰𝘥, 𝘐 𝘢𝘮 𝘱𝘰𝘰𝘳 𝘪𝘯 𝘴𝘱𝘪𝘳𝘪𝘵. 𝘛𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘬 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘯𝘰𝘵 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘤𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘮𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘳𝘦𝘱𝘢𝘪𝘳 𝘮𝘺 𝘰𝘸𝘯 𝘣𝘳𝘰𝘬𝘦𝘯𝘯𝘦𝘴𝘴. 𝘑𝘦𝘴𝘶𝘴, 𝘐 𝘬𝘯𝘰𝘸 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘱𝘳𝘦𝘱𝘢𝘳𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘠𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘢𝘳𝘳𝘪𝘷𝘢𝘭 𝘮𝘦𝘢𝘯𝘴 𝘳𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘰𝘧 𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨𝘴 𝘵𝘩𝘢𝘵 𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘣𝘦𝘵𝘸𝘦𝘦𝘯 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘮𝘦. 𝘏𝘦𝘭𝘱 𝘮𝘦 𝘦𝘮𝘣𝘳𝘢𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘥𝘦𝘮𝘢𝘯𝘥—𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘦𝘹𝘱𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘧𝘳𝘦𝘦𝘥𝘰𝘮—𝘰𝘧 𝘵𝘳𝘶𝘦 𝘳𝘦𝘱𝘦𝘯𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘤𝘦. 𝘐 𝘤𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘠𝘰𝘶 𝘢𝘴 𝘢 𝘣𝘦𝘨𝘨𝘢𝘳, 𝘳𝘦𝘢𝘥𝘺 𝘧𝘰𝘳 𝘠𝘰𝘶𝘳 𝘩𝘦𝘢𝘭𝘪𝘯𝘨, 𝘭𝘪𝘧𝘦-𝘨𝘪𝘷𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘗𝘳𝘦𝘴𝘦𝘯𝘤𝘦.
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Welcome Everyone to the livestream of the Holy Mass. Thank you for joining us.
Streaming and copyright license is through One License #730922-A and CCLI #20486708.
__
Please let us know how we can pray for you. You can either post on the comments below or submit at this link where our Prayer Warriors will lift your prayers up during the daily rosary olmercy.com/prayerforme/

If you need further assistance, please DM us and we can connect with you more intentionally.
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Amen

Have a Good Day OLM FAMILY

Welcome Everyone to the livestream of the Holy Mass. Thank you for joining us.
Streaming and copyright license is through One License #730922-A and CCLI #20486708.
__
Please let us know how we can pray for you. You can either post on the comments below or submit at this link where our Prayer Warriors will lift your prayers up during the daily rosary olmercy.com/prayerforme/

If you need further assistance, please DM us and we can connect with you more intentionally.
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Happy 1st Sunday of Advent! Welcome Everyone to the livestream of the Holy Mass.
You can also view this live stream on our YouTube channel www.youtube.com/ourladyofmercyaurora

As the first word of Advent, Christ tells us, “Stay awake! You must be prepared.” The unprepared people “in the days of Noah” were distracted by their “eating and drinking,” oblivious to the imminent flood. In what does Advent preparation consist? Putting on the Lord Jesus Christ through faith. “Encountering Christ, letting [ourselves] be caught up in and guided by his love, enlarges the horizons of existence, gives it a firm hope which will not disappoint. Faith is no refuge for the fainthearted, but something which enhances our lives. It makes us aware of a magnificent calling, the vocation of love…. Faith is a lamp that guides our steps in the night and suffices for the journey” (Lumen Fidei, 53). “Let us walk in the light of the Lord!”

\_Streaming and copyright license is through One License #730922-A and CCLI #20486708

\_For those who are able, please consider supporting our efforts here at OLM, the offertory can be made through our secure online platform located here bit.ly/33zLmGf Thank you for supporting Our Lady of Mercy, your generosity continues to create more opportunities for OLM to keep our family connected and bring people to Jesus, form them as disciples and send them on mission.

\_For those at the livestream; make an act of Spiritual Communion Prayer bit.ly/2JornB8

\_Livestreaming from the following, please share; this is a wonderful opportunity to share our faith with one another and family and friends from afar.

olmercy.com/
www.facebook.com/olmercy/
www.youtube.com/ourladyofmercyaurora

\_Find community in the following Grow Groups
olmercy.com/amothersheart/
olmercy.com/consumingfire/
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olmercy.com/vineandbranches/

\_Spend your days at Our Lady of Mercy
bit.ly/HangingOutatOLM
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❤️🙏🏻😇

Good Sunday Morning OLM Family...

𝘊𝘩𝘦𝘤𝘬 𝘖𝘶𝘵 𝘖𝘶𝘳 𝗔𝗱𝘃𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗼𝘂𝗿𝗰𝗲𝘀 & 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗲𝗱𝘂𝗹𝗲 𝗣𝗮𝗴𝗲 https://olmercy.com/advent2022/
__
Did Advent sneak up on you too, or is it just us? 

As we begin a big liturgical season, sometimes we feel the pressure to have a perfect and elaborate prayer routine to properly celebrate.  

It can be easy to feel overwhelmed like we messed it up before we even really began.  
God doesn’t want that for you.  

Advent is here and there are several immediate ways to help you enter into the season on the Advent Resources and Schedule page 
where you can also find the following: 
-|- Advent Schedule 
-|- Advent Homilies 
-|- Advent Resources 
-|- Advent Practices and Giving Opportunities
-|- Spiritual Disciplines to Embrace this Advent Season
-|- Advent Flyer
🎄  Christmas Holy Mass Schedule

As we wait in joyful hope and anticipation for our Savior, let us journey together as a community full of expectation to a more peaceful and more meaningful Advent than ever before.   

___
Beginning of Advent Reflection 
Behold, I make all things new. Revelation 21:5  

Each of us carries a deep longing to be made new. That longing is a fundamental part of our humanness. We live it rhythmically as we mark the passing of time—for example, with the changing of the calendar every January. The new year often brings resolutions to become better at what matters most, to refocus, to make changes. Even though our resolutions often crumble, the repeated effort of making them speaks to our aching desire to be better and our attempts to become so. 

In an even deeper manner, the Catholic faith is marked to its very core by God’s ceaseless invitation to begin anew. For the believer, each year is interwoven with the movements of the liturgical seasons, the repetition of which perpetually draws us more and more deeply into life in Christ. 

In secular terms, the new year begins in January. But on the spiritual plane, our new year starts even earlier, with Advent. Advent is, in a real sense, our annual new beginning. It can and should be marked with the same drive to refocus, but on a goal beyond weight loss or picking up a new hobby. 

Advent is a time to prepare for the Second Coming of Christ, as we remember the first time He came to us and see Him come to us again and again. Of all the seasons of the year, Advent offers us perhaps the clearest sense of adventure and journey. It is a season for resetting our horizon, reframing our movement toward fullness in Christ. And even though Advent is brief, it is filled with spiritual riches. Yet, because Advent falls during a busy time of year, we often rush over or even miss the treasures God places before us in the Church. This Advent page and resources we handed out is born out of a desire to lift these gifts up and hold them out to you in a way that deepens your entry into the greatest of mysteries. 

We pray that these resources will help you settle down and enter into a journey that, year after year, promises to transform our lives. We really do set out on an adventure together, as a Church, every year. In this season of longing, hope, and new beginnings, let us move toward a deeper adoration of the King of kings, who comes in the quiet of the night to save us. When we engage the movements of the season, we begin to sing more fully that cherished hymn: O come, let us adore Him, O come, let us adore Him, O come, let us adore Him, Christ the Lord. 

https://olmercy.com/advent2022/

𝘊𝘩𝘦𝘤𝘬 𝘖𝘶𝘵 𝘖𝘶𝘳 𝗔𝗱𝘃𝗲𝗻𝘁 𝗥𝗲𝘀𝗼𝘂𝗿𝗰𝗲𝘀 & 𝗦𝗰𝗵𝗲𝗱𝘂𝗹𝗲 𝗣𝗮𝗴𝗲 olmercy.com/advent2022/
__
Did Advent sneak up on you too, or is it just us?

As we begin a big liturgical season, sometimes we feel the pressure to have a perfect and elaborate prayer routine to properly celebrate.

It can be easy to feel overwhelmed like we messed it up before we even really began.
God doesn’t want that for you.

Advent is here and there are several immediate ways to help you enter into the season on the Advent Resources and Schedule page
where you can also find the following:
-|- Advent Schedule
-|- Advent Homilies
-|- Advent Resources
-|- Advent Practices and Giving Opportunities
-|- Spiritual Disciplines to Embrace this Advent Season
-|- Advent Flyer
🎄 Christmas Holy Mass Schedule

As we wait in joyful hope and anticipation for our Savior, let us journey together as a community full of expectation to a more peaceful and more meaningful Advent than ever before.

___
Beginning of Advent Reflection
"Behold, I make all things new." Revelation 21:5

Each of us carries a deep longing to be made new. That longing is a fundamental part of our humanness. We live it rhythmically as we mark the passing of time—for example, with the changing of the calendar every January. The new year often brings resolutions to become better at what matters most, to refocus, to make changes. Even though our resolutions often crumble, the repeated effort of making them speaks to our aching desire to be better and our attempts to become so.

In an even deeper manner, the Catholic faith is marked to its very core by God’s ceaseless invitation to begin anew. For the believer, each year is interwoven with the movements of the liturgical seasons, the repetition of which perpetually draws us more and more deeply into life in Christ.

In secular terms, the new year begins in January. But on the spiritual plane, our new year starts even earlier, with Advent. Advent is, in a real sense, our annual new beginning. It can and should be marked with the same drive to refocus, but on a goal beyond weight loss or picking up a new hobby.

Advent is a time to prepare for the Second Coming of Christ, as we remember the first time He came to us and see Him come to us again and again. Of all the seasons of the year, Advent offers us perhaps the clearest sense of adventure and journey. It is a season for resetting our horizon, reframing our movement toward fullness in Christ. And even though Advent is brief, it is filled with spiritual riches. Yet, because Advent falls during a busy time of year, we often rush over or even miss the treasures God places before us in the Church. This Advent page and resources we handed out is born out of a desire to lift these gifts up and hold them out to you in a way that deepens your entry into the greatest of mysteries.

We pray that these resources will help you settle down and enter into a journey that, year after year, promises to transform our lives. We really do set out on an adventure together, as a Church, every year. In this season of longing, hope, and new beginnings, let us move toward a deeper adoration of the King of kings, who comes in the quiet of the night to save us. When we engage the movements of the season, we begin to sing more fully that cherished hymn: O come, let us adore Him, O come, let us adore Him, O come, let us adore Him, Christ the Lord.

olmercy.com/advent2022/
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𝗔𝗦𝗦𝗜𝗦𝗧 𝗙𝗔𝗠𝗜𝗟𝗜𝗘𝗦 𝗜𝗡 𝗡𝗘𝗘𝗗 𝘁𝗵𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗴𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗔𝗻𝗴𝗲𝗹 𝗚𝗶𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗣𝗿𝗼𝗴𝗿𝗮𝗺
Pick up a stocking after all Mass times this weekend 11/26 & 11/27 and return it by Sunday 12/11 filled with any of the suggested items!
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This year’s program benefits those individuals assisted by SVDP, Hesed House & Aurora Interfaith Food Pantry.  Here are the following ways you can assist families in need over the holidays.

Pick-up a stocking after any of the masses the weekend of November 26/27. Fill your stocking with stuffers & return it to the bin by the Welcome Desk or to the Main Office by Sunday 12/11!  Benefits kids @ Aurora Food Pantry.

Monetary donations can be made under the Angel Giving Fund via our online giving portal or via check made payable to Our Lady of Mercy with “Angel Giving” in the memo for tax purposes. Accepted thru 12/31.

𝗔𝗦𝗦𝗜𝗦𝗧 𝗙𝗔𝗠𝗜𝗟𝗜𝗘𝗦 𝗜𝗡 𝗡𝗘𝗘𝗗 𝘁𝗵𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗴𝗵 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗔𝗻𝗴𝗲𝗹 𝗚𝗶𝘃𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝗣𝗿𝗼𝗴𝗿𝗮𝗺
Pick up a stocking after all Mass times this weekend 11/26 & 11/27 and return it by Sunday 12/11 filled with any of the suggested items!
__
This year’s program benefits those individuals assisted by SVDP, Hesed House & Aurora Interfaith Food Pantry. Here are the following ways you can assist families in need over the holidays.

Pick-up a stocking after any of the masses the weekend of November 26/27. Fill your stocking with stuffers & return it to the bin by the Welcome Desk or to the Main Office by Sunday 12/11! Benefits kids @ Aurora Food Pantry.

Monetary donations can be made under the Angel Giving Fund via our online giving portal or via check made payable to Our Lady of Mercy with “Angel Giving” in the memo for tax purposes. Accepted thru 12/31.
... See MoreSee Less

Who is St. Catherine of Alexandria?

According to tradition, Catherine was a young noblewoman schooled in Alexandria in Egypt, one of the great centers of learning in the ancient world.

After successfully arguing the case for Christianity with pagan philosophers before the Emperor Maxentius, she was threatened with torture on a spiked wheel. The wheel miraculously exploded, and the emperor had Catherine beheaded.

Before her death Catherine declared her intent to grant the requests of those who prayed to her. She was counted among the Fourteen Holy Helpers, the saints invoked in times of pestilence and plague by the faithful of medieval Germany. Saint John Paul II restored Catherine’s feast to the universal calendar in 2002.

Who is St. Catherine of Alexandria?

According to tradition, Catherine was a young noblewoman schooled in Alexandria in Egypt, one of the great centers of learning in the ancient world.

After successfully arguing the case for Christianity with pagan philosophers before the Emperor Maxentius, she was threatened with torture on a spiked wheel. The wheel miraculously exploded, and the emperor had Catherine beheaded.

Before her death Catherine declared her intent to grant the requests of those who prayed to her. She was counted among the Fourteen Holy Helpers, the saints invoked in times of pestilence and plague by the faithful of medieval Germany. Saint John Paul II restored Catherine’s feast to the universal calendar in 2002.
... See MoreSee Less

𝗛𝗔𝗣𝗣𝗬 𝗧𝗛𝗔𝗡𝗞𝗦𝗚𝗜𝗩𝗜𝗡𝗚!
If you asked us, we’d say 𝘄𝗲’𝗿𝗲 𝗴𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗳𝘂𝗹 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘆𝗼𝘂🧡! We love getting to love, serve, and grow with you and your family! 

On behalf of Father Michael, Father James, Deacons and the staff of Our Lady of Mercy, we wish you a very joyous and blessed Thanksgiving.  We pray that your day is restful and filled with joy today and may Our Lady of Mercy, be your guide always.

𝗛𝗔𝗣𝗣𝗬 𝗧𝗛𝗔𝗡𝗞𝗦𝗚𝗜𝗩𝗜𝗡𝗚!
If you asked us, we’d say 𝘄𝗲’𝗿𝗲 𝗴𝗿𝗮𝘁𝗲𝗳𝘂𝗹 𝗳𝗼𝗿 𝘆𝗼𝘂🧡! We love getting to love, serve, and grow with you and your family!

On behalf of Father Michael, Father James, Deacons and the staff of Our Lady of Mercy, we wish you a very joyous and blessed Thanksgiving. We pray that your day is restful and filled with joy today and may Our Lady of Mercy, be your guide always.
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Have a Blessed and Happy Thanksgiving 🦃🦃

Happy Thanksgiving 🦃🍁

Amen. 🙏🏽🙏🏽

Who was Saint Andrew Dũng-Lac and who are his Companions?

In God’s hand is the soul of every living thing,/ and the life breath of all mankind. (cf. Job 12:10)

The martyrs bear witness to the core of Christ’s sacrifice: they ­surrender their lives into God’s hands to do with as he wills. To them, the present cost of their offering counts as nothing in comparison to life with the Lord who awaits them.

Andrew Dung-Lac, a Catholic convert ordained to the priesthood, was one of 117 people martyred in Vietnam between 1820 and 1862. Members of the companions group gave their lives for Christ in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, and received beatification during four different occasions between 1900 and 1951. All were canonized during the papacy of Saint John Paul II.

Andrew Dũng-Lac, who heads this group of 117 Vietnamese martyrs, was born in Bac Ninh, a village northeast of Hanoi. It was in Hanoi that, as a boy of twelve, he met the faith through a Catholic lay catechist. After his baptism, Andrew studied Chinese, Latin, and theology. He was ordained as a diocesan priest in 1823. His fervent preaching and simple, prayerful demeanor endeared him to his parishioners, who raised the money to ransom him from prison the first two times he was arrested. A third time he was arrested with fellow priest Peter Thi. They were soon re-arrested and taken to Hanoi, where both suffered dreadful torture. Finally they both were beheaded

This group was made up of ninety-six Vietnamese, eleven Spaniards, and ten French. Eight of the group were bishops, fifty were priests and fifty-nine were lay Catholics including a 9-year-old child. Some of the priests were Dominicans, others were diocesan priests who belonged to the Paris Mission Society.

This feast day, and the witnesses of the lives of the martyrs, give testament to the sufferings inflicted on the Vietnamese Church, which are among the most terrible in the long history of Christian martyrdom.

Who was Saint Andrew Dũng-Lac and who are his Companions?

In God’s hand is the soul of every living thing,/ and the life breath of all mankind. (cf. Job 12:10)

The martyrs bear witness to the core of Christ’s sacrifice: they ­surrender their lives into God’s hands to do with as he wills. To them, the present cost of their offering counts as nothing in comparison to life with the Lord who awaits them.

Andrew Dung-Lac, a Catholic convert ordained to the priesthood, was one of 117 people martyred in Vietnam between 1820 and 1862. Members of the companions group gave their lives for Christ in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, and received beatification during four different occasions between 1900 and 1951. All were canonized during the papacy of Saint John Paul II.

Andrew Dũng-Lac, who heads this group of 117 Vietnamese martyrs, was born in Bac Ninh, a village northeast of Hanoi. It was in Hanoi that, as a boy of twelve, he met the faith through a Catholic lay catechist. After his baptism, Andrew studied Chinese, Latin, and theology. He was ordained as a diocesan priest in 1823. His fervent preaching and simple, prayerful demeanor endeared him to his parishioners, who raised the money to ransom him from prison the first two times he was arrested. A third time he was arrested with fellow priest Peter Thi. They were soon re-arrested and taken to Hanoi, where both suffered dreadful torture. Finally they both were beheaded

This group was made up of ninety-six Vietnamese, eleven Spaniards, and ten French. Eight of the group were bishops, fifty were priests and fifty-nine were lay Catholics including a 9-year-old child. Some of the priests were Dominicans, others were diocesan priests who belonged to the Paris Mission Society.

This feast day, and the witnesses of the lives of the martyrs, give testament to the sufferings inflicted on the Vietnamese Church, which are among the most terrible in the long history of Christian martyrdom.
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